Human Rights Education project is a non-profit organization that encourages grassroots non-governmental organizations to participate in the movement for educating the public about human rights. Organizations do this simply and without cost by adopting a human rights quotation and adding it to their website, letterhead, and brochures. The website contains all necessary information; specialists are available online to assist you.
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Introduction

Background

The project in depth

Advisory board


The Project in Depth

The starting point of Project Human Rights Education is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights makes it clear that everyone, with no exceptions of any kind, is entitled to human rights by virtue of being a human being.

Every country that belongs to the United Nations has agreed to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Project Human Rights Education serves to educate people around the world about their rights under national and international law, starting with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Project accomplishes this by working one-on-one with local organizations to incorporate relevant quotations from international documents into their printed material, and enabling NGOs to spread knowledge of these rights to their membership.

Knowing about rights is the first step towards securing rights.

Everyone has the right to education.
Article 26(1), Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 10 December 1948.

Each State Party shall ensure that any statement which is established to have been made as a result of torture shall not be invoked as evidence in any proceedings...
Article 15, Convention Against Torture, in force 1987.

Each State Party shall ensure that all acts of torture are offences under its criminal law..
Article 4, Convention Against Torture, in force 1987.

Everyone shall have the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.
Article 18, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, in force 1976.

Participating Organizations include:

  • non-profits

  • grassroots groups

  • Non-Governmental Organizations

  • church groups

  • regional organizations

  • national networks

  • global Internet associations

What in fact are human rights?

International human rights treaties deal with five categories of rights: civil, political, economic, social and cultural. Once governments ratify a treaty - any treaty, including human rights treaties - they are legally committed to enforcing them. Every person -- as an individual or as part of a group -- is entitled to learn which rights are in force in their country. Everyone is free to make use of that information, and to share that information with others, to help improve the promotion and protection of human rights for themselves and for others.

Years after the Universal Declaration was adopted, the family of nations again emphasized the importance of educating people about human rights. In 1994, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed the years 1995-2005 to be the

Decade of Human Rights Education.

The Basic Idea

Project Human Rights Education began its work in response to the worldwide call for action on human rights education. Simply put, people need to have knowledge about their rights before they can be in a position to act on them.

The Project starts from a simple concept, and is easy to carry out.

The Project's Purpose

The Project helps bring information about human rights emanating from national and international levels into the daily life of people at the grassroots level. The Project's purpose is to generate the inclusion of a relevant human rights quotation in each NGO's communications materials.

Why NGOs?

Virtually all Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), whatever work they do, are fulfilling human rights as laid out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. As NGOs of all sorts go about their business, they routinely communicate with their members. Every time any organization is in contact with its members, the opportunity is there to enrich its message by naming and identifying a related human right. Every time an organization communicates with its constituency, it is automatically in a position to educate about a relevant human right.

The Project works one-to-one with each organization, to guide it in adopting one particular human right quotation relevant to the organization's mandate.

The Project's human rights educators are available to assist NGOs interested in adopting a relevant quotation. The human rights educators who contribute their services to this Project are professionals in the field of human rights. Guided by your organization's mandate, the human rights educators are ready to assist in selecting a relevant human rights quotation.

The Project will be available in other languages. Bosnian and Indonesian language versions are in progress, and will be available soon.

Project Human Rights Education is a project of The Fund for Peace, a non-profit organization based in Washington D.C. The mission of The Fund for Peace is to prevent war and alleviate the conditions that cause war.

Project Human Rights Education has adopted the following human rights quotation, printed on our letterhead stationery and our website:

"Everyone has the right to education." Article 26(1), Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 10 December 1948.

Your Organization

Your organization already informs people about certain rights. It may be the right to participate in cultural, social or political activities, or the right to gather with other people to discuss freely things that matter to you, or the right to housing, or the right of women to be safe from violence, or the right of the child to be protected and educated. There are many other rights as well.

To participate in this Project, organizations agree that they will print information about a particular right, usually the right that is central to the organization's goals and mandate. That human rights information, printed on the organization's stationery or fund-raisers or tee-shirts, then becomes an integral part of the organization's regular message. It is printed just as routinely as the organization prints its address and phone number. By doing this, organizations create a link between their usual activities and the broader field of human rights. By doing this, they help the public learn about yet another practical every-day aspect of human rights. By doing this, we are all giving real meaning to the aspirations behind the Decade of Human Rights Education.

It's that simple. There is no cost of any sort.

Some of the Project's Collaborators

  • In Bosnia & Herzegovina, where the Project first developed, a women's human rights organization in Sarajevo, Zene Zenama, prints Article 15 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women on their letterhead.

  • In the USA, Amnesty International USA prints Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on the home page of their website (See Contacts page).

  • In Indonesia, an organization in Jakarta working against discrimination, Solidaritas Nusa-Bangsa, prints Article 3 of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination on their letterhead.

  • In San Francisco, Balkan Youth Link prints Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on its letterhead.

  • In Sarajevo, the Center for Torture Victims has printed Articles 2 and 14 of the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment on large posters that are in the Reception area where survivors await therapy.

  • In San Francisco, Crabgrass: Working for Social Change, prints Article 27 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights on its letterhead and its Newsletter.

History of the Project

Project Human Rights Education was conceived of by a group of human rights educators as a way for grassroots organizations to bring information to their communities about their rights. Human Rights Education logically begins with the rights laid out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and goes forward with related human rights treaties. National governments have legally bound themselves to implement those human rights treaties, and to carry out Human Rights Education. The extent to which governments' obligations are carried out depends in large measure on the degree to which they are persuaded by civil society. NGOs are part of civil society. NGOs constitute an underused network for educating about human rights. Collaboration with NGOs is basic to the work of the Project.

 

The Fund for Peace website

Text-only version (all other languages)

Download the HRE flyer

 

Project Human Rights Education is a project of The Fund for Peace, a non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C. The Fund for Peace works to prevent war and alleviate the conditions that cause war.